Posts Tagged ‘Death’

Day 278 – Death and all his friends

I was watching a scene from a soap today where a funeral took place and it just struck me the different types of clothes people wear to commemorate and celebrate their loved ones lives. Black seems to be the obvious choice as the colour of death, the colour of mourning. Add veils and/or dark sunnies and the air of mournfulless is quite aptly conveyed. I did see one character in a creamy suit and of course there is the option to wear bright colours that tell everyone you want to celebrate that the person’s lived, more than be sad they died. I remember Prince Charles, at Princess Diana’s funeral wore a blue suit instead of the traditional black as it was her favourite colour suit on him. I thought that was a nice touch.

However if I was to dictate what I’d like people to wear at my funeral I’d like everyone to wear black. Not just a black top or skirt or shoes but EVERY item of clothing, not even a hint of anything else. Then I’d like everyone to joke about the amount of black they’re wearing! Because in everything, I think you have to laugh!

Quotes of the day:

Oh, for the time when I shall sleep
Without identity.
~Emily Bronte

Gaily I lived as ease and nature taught,
And spent my little life without a thought,
And am amazed that Death, that tyrant grim,
Should think of me, who never thought of him.
~René Francois Regnier

Death is for many of us the gate of hell; but we are inside on the way out, not outside on the way in.  – George Bernard Shaw

And something a little less morbid!

I knew a man who once said, “death smiles at us all; all a man can do is smile back.”  – From the movie Gladiator

Day 231 – Mrs Macquarie’s Point

Whilst procrastinating about my college assignment today I went to the NSW Art Gallery for some inspiration and ended up thinking about what Sydney must’ve been like in the 1800s. I sat watching the people out for Sunday strolls at Mrs Macquarie’s Point and thought most things haven’t changed much at all. I’m sure the thoughts and conversations are about fundamentally similar things, love, life and death. And the world revolving around an iconic harbour.

People contemplate life…

and love…

and everything in between.

Moving…

and stopping to rest.

Of course technology has changed and it has changed our way of living so that we feel more different compared to our ancestors than we probably are. We drive modern boats and trains and buses and cars but essentially they are still only modes of transport just like horses and bikes. We use mobile phones but they are merely methods of communication like letters and gossip. We have digital cameras that record moments just like the important ones that are permanently imprinted in our brains.

But for some reason the biggest difference I thought was jogging. The vast majority of people occupying Mrs Macquarie’s Point today were joggers. There wasn’t very many pictures in the Art Gallery of people exercising in older times and for that reason I just can’t picture the folks of 1847 or similar years pounding the pavement to shed a few pounds in order to fit into a Victorian corset. Then again I could be wrong!

Day 47 – Sadness in Parting

Practical people want to expect the unexpected and creative people want to do the unexpected! Both are clouded in an eternal mystery that no one can close to understanding. There is very little art that doesn’t come from something that has already existed (well according to one theory, and my college lecturer!) and there are very few ways of predicting where our lives will take us, no matter how planned out you think you may be.

I mean who would’ve predicted the Irish economic collapse, the death of Princess Diana, the rise of Hitler, various world events that would’ve had people laughing at you if you dared suggest their imminence. My life has always been unexpected. Aged 15 I never expected I would someday look back at my school years and be glad the experience made me who I am. Aged 16 I never expected to play camogie or football again, I ended up playing both for Munster. Aged 18 I never thought I would love my college years the way I did. I never thought Killeedy would win a county title, even 5 minutes before we won the first of 4! I thought I would come to Australia in 2005 for no more than 3 months, I’ve now spent 3 years. I look at life now and no matter where it seems to be leading, for good or bad, I can smile and think you just can’t predict it at all.

I never expected to find myself in Melbourne today, and I’m sure my grandmother never expected to watch her brother’s funeral on a computer screen at the other side of the world. Death is unavoidable, and sometimes expected, but always fraught with emotion that can be an essential part of the grieving process. Maybe funerals are reminders of our own mortality, or an event where we ponder our connection with a person who is no longer as we are, alive. Whatever the psychology its hard not to be affected, its hard to feel the pain of the loved ones whose lives will now be uprooted from a happy daily routine. No matter how old, how young, how sick or how tragic death is, it can never truly be expected, conceived or fully prepared for, and neither can life.

Quote of the Day:

“When you were born, you cried and the world rejoiced.
Live your life so that when you die, the world cries and you rejoice.”

Day 43 – For Whom The Bell Tolls

Words don’t really cut it on days like today, certainly not mine. Here’s what I want to say:

For Whom The Bell Tolls – John Donne

No man is an island,
Entire of itself.
Each is a piece of the continent,
A part of the main.
If a clod be washed away by the sea,
Europe is the less.
As well as if a promontory were.
As well as if a manner of thine own
Or of thine friend’s were.
Each man’s death diminishes me,
For I am involved in mankind.
Therefore, send not to know
For whom the bell tolls,
It tolls for thee.

Quote of the day: “Love is stronger than death even though it can’t stop death from happening, but no matter how hard death tries it can’t separate people from love. It can’t take away our memories either. In the end, life is stronger than death.” – Anon

RIP Denis